FINGERPRINT: the toolbox

infrastructuur-fingerprint00021-1In a previous blogpost, we introduced the FINGERPRINT project. FINGERPRINT is an interdisciplinary collection and data management project on the exceptional collection of graphic works by Pieter Bruegel the Elder (ca. 1520-1569). It involves the collection and processing of a large amount of visual and material data. To obtain that visual data we have an extensive toolbox at our disposal: a high resolution medium format digital back, a motorized repro stand, a Nikon DSLR modified for multispectral imaging with a collection of multispectral filters, the RICH microdomes and much more. A brief overview. Continue reading

Endangered collections: risks and strategies

knipsel

During the Great War, in the night of 25-26 August 1914, soldiers set the fourteenth-century University Hall and its eighteenth-century library wing of the University of Leuven (Belgium) ablaze. To commemorate the hundredth Anniversary of the Library’s destruction, the University of Leuven (KU Leuven) organized a three day international conference on the challenging topic: What do we lose when we lose a library? with the support of the Goethe-Institut Brüssel and the British Council, Brussels.  Continue reading

Magister Dixit: KU Leuven and UCL collections completed

Magister Dixit projectThe Imaging Lab recently completed the digitisation of 301 manuscripts with lecture notes of the ancient University of Louvain. Digitisation took place as part of the Magister Dixit project, for Lectio, and with support of the InBev-Baillet Latour Fund. Lecture notes have naturally been scattered all over Europe but both KU Leuven and the UCL built up extensive collections after the destruction of the library during World War II in which 68 manuscripts were lost. The recently gathered collection is now virtually reunited. Continue reading

The 8th century Codex Eyckensis digitised and made available online

Codex Eyckensis

Codex Eyckensis A

In close collaboration with Prof. Lieve Watteeuw (Illuminare – Centre for the Study of Medieval Art), the Imaging Lab meticulously digitised the Codex Eyckensis. The codex is the oldest preserved “book” produced in the Low Countries, the wider area encompassing contemporary Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg. The Codex can now be accessed online through LIBIS. Continue reading